Tag Archives: positivity

Discovering Our Resilience

By Alyssa Delarosa

Edited by Natalie Grace Sipula

[3.5 minute read]

What is it exactly that enables us to leave our beds every morning? What is it that motivates us to perform daily tasks such as school, homework, studying, work, chores, etc.? In the midst of a now year-long global pandemic, how are we still able to function? In each of us, there exists a trait called resilience that is the driving force behind our decisions to perform our daily tasks even while the world outside is undergoing a chaotic time. Resilience means that while we may have a million things happening either directly to us or around us, we are able to still carry on with our responsibilities. We do this by prioritizing certain tasks as essential duties meaning that we are so bound and determined to follow through on our decision(s), we will ignore all other things attempting to distract us from our priorities. So why is this important?

Photo by Holly Mandarich on Unsplash

The reason why I chose to write this article on resilience is because I strongly feel that we have an issue with recognizing and acknowledging our own resilience, and therefore we do not give ourselves the credit and acknowledgment we deserve. Prioritizing certain tasks and events over others, even while the world may be falling apart around us, is no small feat. I firmly believe that we owe it to ourselves to recognize our resilience in the daily, seemingly insignificant decisions that we make. By choosing to recognize our resilience and give ourselves credit, we are making the decision to show ourselves self-care. We are also feeding our confidence and self-esteem in a healthy way.

How can we recognize and acknowledge our resilience? Personally, I try to be mindful of the fact that every decision I make is important and give myself credit for prioritizing things even if they are small such as getting out of bed, attending class, and opening up my textbook to study for my exam. I recommend that you do the same: Give credit to yourself for every decision you make even if it seems small, getting out of bed when the world is falling to pieces and showing up to your Zoom lecture to take notes and listen are no easy tasks.

Photo by Dan Meyers on Unsplash
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Adapting In A New Place 

By Rio Jackson

Building confidence and increasing your self-esteem is vital in adapting in a new social setting. I will briefly walk you through a journey on how to channel and become “the best you”. The awkwardness, stumbling out of words or becoming distant can negatively impact your engagement with your peers. College is one of the best places to practice embracing new cultures, learning new languages, meeting new friends and expanding your comfort zone.

Here are a few tips you can use to expand your surroundings and stay on track:

Try something new.

Meaning, go to that yoga class you heard about. Try that restaurant you seen on Yelp, or go see that movie you heard great things about. Remember to try something new when you are ready. You never want to feel rushed or peer-pressured into doing something you’re not prepared to do. Start where you are comfortable.

List your short and long-term goals.

This best way to measure your growth, is to document it. Short goals can include, making sure you set time for self-care. Remember, some goals can be set with your own deadlines.

Practice positive affirmations.

Speaking positively is a great way to begin your day. Some affirmations can include: I will seize the day, I am the master of my fate, I will do and be my best. Affirmations can remind you to be encouraged and build your self-esteem.

Meet new people.

Take some time to introduce yourself to a new classmate. Typically, you have shared interest with your classmates, and will spend a lot of class time with them. Building friendships is a part of the college experience. Make sure you get know the community surrounding USC and explore the school’s culture. Free events are always available and serve as perfect opportunity to meet new people.

Stay connected with your roots.

Keep in contact with your family or friends that keep you grounded. Stay in contact with your family who can positively impact your adjustment to your new school. Lastly, great friends can give you the push you need to finish your semester strong!

Good luck and remember to take care of yourself.

Featured image from Pixabay

Continue reading Adapting In A New Place 

The Revolving Door

By Zachary Cantrell

Graduation. I can feel it hovering over nearly every conversation I have with my friends, colleagues, family, and even acquaintances, like a ponderous star destroyer, a harbinger of the end times.

“You’re almost done!”

“The last leg…”

“Make it count!”

“The last push!”

It makes me feel as if I am reaching the end of the line. The big race. My life. Honestly, it starts to feel that way sometimes. It’s as if I have lived out my life of education, and beginning my life as… a real person, I suppose? It’s positively daunting. How do I completely construct a new life? I have been wrapping my mind around this for months now, until recently when I began to look at things in a slightly different way. This is not an ending of one life and the beginning of another. Afterall, we only get one life each!

It sounds ridiculously obvious. Of course we only have one life. Here is a different way of looking at it. Last spring, I was in an acting class with a professor named Joseph Hacker, which I enjoyed immensely. One day in class, he said something that gripped me, and stuck with me all this time: “This is the work.” Basically, what we do here is not in preparation for something else. It is not two separate things, the preparation and then the thing, but the preparation IS the thing. It’s all happening, in the here and now, on a continuum.

I could write this off as an isolated circumstance, since I usually like to have more than one credible source on such matters (thank you, Writing 340). However, I was recently in a production of a play by Tom Stoppard called Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead. Forever a fan of Stoppard’s writing, I took his printed words to heart, especially the phrase, “Every exit is an entrance somewhere else.” It nearly blew my mind. Our lives are not a play, with different scenes to mark the biggest moments of our adventure. Life is a revolving door, out of one place and into another. It’s all there, it’s all fair game, and it never stops.

What I am getting at with all of this existential blathering is this: What we did here, are doing here, or will do here at USC is not preliminary. Maybe for some classes it is about going through the motions for the letter grade, or maybe some of the people I met here will never enter into my life again. However, I cannot deny that all of it, “significant” or not, has played an essential part in my identity, here and now.

Graduation is neither an end, nor a beginning. It’s a part of the whole, and a very important one at that. So whether you are walking the stage this Friday, or just beginning your time here at USC, think of it not as a means to an end. Dig deeper. Consider how this university changes you, and how you change it. Because I guarantee that, no matter how big or small the changes are, they are there. And they matter.

Featured image from Pxfuel

Zachary Cantrell is a senior in the BFA Acting program at USC. He has performed in numerous productions during his time here, most recently with Downtown Repertory Theatre at The Pico House. He is also currently pursuing a minor in Cinema. In his free time he enjoys reading, playing racquetball, and bouldering.